Understanding Blood Alcohol Content and How it is Measured

A person’s Blood Alcohol Content, or BAC, is the percentage of alcohol present in your body. The higher your BAC, the more alcohol you have in your system. The legal limit in the United States is .08% alcohol. Your BAC is dependent on a variety of factors, including your sex, your weight, the speed of your metabolism, your medications, health conditions you may have, how much food you have consumed throughout the day, and of course, how many alcoholic drinks you have had.

So how exactly is your BAC measured? Law enforcement officers use a variety of different measures and tests to determine if you are over the legal limit and thus not legally allowed to drive. If you are ever pulled over by a law enforcement officer under the suspicion that you are driving while intoxicated, the officer will probably first subject you to a series of questions about your previous activity. Where are you coming from? Have you been drinking? How many drinks have you had tonight? If after this series of questions, the officer still suspects that you may be over the legal limit, he or she will probably subject you to a combination of field sobriety tests. Examples of these tests include a walk and turn, a one legged stand, and a horizontal gaze test. If you fail one or more of these tests, the officer has cause to believe that you are too intoxicated to drive and may take you into custody and ask you to submit to other testing.

The most common test to determine your BAC is the breathanalyzer. This machine uses infrared light to determine how much alcohol is present in your body as you breathe into the machine. Since the machine cannot determine factors such as your metabolism rate and food consumption, the machine relies on a conversion factor to determine your BAC. Therefore, the number it provides is not 100% accurate, but instead a close estimate.

A much more accurate BAC test is the BAC blood test. With this test, a sample of blood is taken and the amount of alcohol present in the body is directly measured. These tests are very accurate because they need no conversion factor to estimate your BAC. However, even with their high level of accuracy, problems can occur either when the test is administered or as the sample is transported and handled.

If you are ever charged with a DUI, you should be familiar with BAC tests and how they work. For more information about BAC tests and their potential inaccuracies, visit the website of Rhode Island DUI lawyer James Powderly.  

Do You Measure Up? Proving That Legal Departments Are More Than a Cost Center

General Counsel (GC) across most industries remain under pressure to operate efficiently, cut costs and maximize existing resources. In order to properly measure just how successful a Lawyer is operating today under these mandates, it is vital that in-house legal teams have a system of metrics and measurements in place. By measuring efficiencies, GCs can demonstrate their value to the organization and can provide proof points that help their legal department gain the trust and respect of company executives.

Are GCs on board?

In a recent survey, GCs were asked, “Do Metrics Provide a Useful and Accurate Measure of the Legal Department’s Value to the Business?” In response, 66% of General Counsel (GC) said that metrics do not provide a good measure of the legal department’s value. Additionally, most GCs reported that they do not use metrics to assess the legal department’s performance (58%), and they do not believe that metrics assist in analyzing the legal department’s value (66%).

Measuring cost vs. value

Why? When considering Conferences metrics generally, they are most often designed to measure only the legal department’s cost to the organization, rather than the department’s value. For example, the most common metrics in legal departments are:

* Legal expenses as a percentage of corporate revenue

* The cost of outside counsel

* Internal Legal Process Outsourcing department costs

* Cost per matter

* Average billing rate

It’s easy to see that these metrics are more about cost than value. To accurately capture value, a legal department needs to tell a complete and balanced story and show not simply the dollars being spent by a Lawyer, but how much that department has saved the organization from spending or losing. There are a number of methods to measure both the tangible and intangible value of a legal department. Here are a few:

* Feedback from client surveys that focus on quality of service, efficiency, commerciality and communication

* Assessing matter success rates

* Calculating dollars saved by negotiating better rates or AFAs with outside counsel

* Documentation of the where the LPO team added commercial value in a matter

* Tracking of the actual risks that were avoided

* Tracking the cost of internal legal resource against external hourly spend

* Regular reports to the business and/or board of directors

Going back to the aforementioned survey, most GCs believed their in-house legal teams were viewed as both legal counsel and strategic business partner. In fact only 19% reported that their in-house teams were seen purely as legal counsel. This demonstrates that GCs are being asked to play a greater strategic role in their organizations. It also reinforces the need for GCs to use metrics to prove value. As we approach mid-year, GCs will likely continue to search for new ways to heighten the efficiency of their departments, while working steadily to provide more value to their organizations as strategic partners.

Check more info about: Legal Conferences in USA and Legal Event UK 2014

Legal Marketing – A Primer

When marketing your law practice, your success in increasing traffic is determined by your ability to provide valuable services to existing customers, and communicate that value to prospects. This means you need to have an open dialogue with your customers and be tuned in to your market. Here is a full primer to educate you on the matter of legal marketing, so that you can build a campaign that works and drives customer traffic to your business.

1. Have a measurement system in place

In order to be effective in marketing, you need to have a way to track the performance of your efforts. This can be as simple as plugging Google Analytics into your website to track traffic, or more advanced methods, such as having an information capture when new customers come in so you can learn how they heard about you. Without measuring, you have no way to know where you are, what to do next, or if what you are doing is working. You need to have some sort of feedback system in place before you even begin a campaign.

2. Create value and authority

The best form of marketing is completely organic. You provide excellent service to a client, they tell all of their friends and family about their incredible experience, and suddenly you have two or three new clients knocking on your door. A great way to build this kind of branding leverage is to provide incredible value to your prospects and customers. Be willing to give away something, even if only information, for free. Volunteer to speak at local clubs and business organizations, or write informative articles and blog posts. Try to give your clients value before you have even met them.

3. Meet your prospects where they are

Marketing is not rocket science. It is simply communicating with your market, the people who are willing and able to purchase your products and services. Technology has exponentially increased the avenues by which you can accomplish this goal. Invest in marketing through multiple mediums. For instance, you can build and optimize your Website, use social media to reach your customers, or engage in direct mail campaigns. There are many different ways to reach your customers, find out which work best for your business.

4. Use feedback to readjust

Marketing, is in many ways as much science as it is art. That is why it is so important that you measure and record customer responses. With every campaign, you are essentially performing a social experiment, and measuring how people respond to it.

Measure the customer response to every marketing initiative you execute. Pay close attention to how, where, and when you execute each ad, email, or direct mail campaign, and attempt to measure the traffic generated from each. Using the information you collect, experiment with different campaigns to see what is the most effective in terms of cost and return on investment. Since there are infinite opportunities for marketing, you can constantly try new things and refine your approach.